ISSN: 2375-379X
Health Sciences Research  
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Knowledge and Practice of Needle Stick and Sharp Injuries Prevention Among Health Care Workers in a Tertiary Hospital in Enugu State Nigeria
Health Sciences Research
Vol.5 , No. 1, Publication Date: Jan. 11, 2018, Page: 1-9
300 Views Since January 11, 2018, 183 Downloads Since Jan. 11, 2018
 
 
Authors
 
[1]    

Nkechi Kemmy Uwakwe, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

[2]    

Emmanuel Nwabueze Aguwa, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

[3]    

Kelechi Kemnele, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

[4]    

Emmanuel Tyokumbur, Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

 
Abstract
 

Occupational health hazard still remains a burden resulting in such conditions as pneumoconiosis, silicosis and blood-borne infections of which human immunodeficiency infection is inclusive. Needle sticks and other sharps-related injuries which expose workers to blood borne pathogens continue to be a significant hazard for hospital employees. This study examined knowledge and practice of Needle stick and sharp injuries prevention among health care workers. This is to determine the factors that affect the preventive practices of health care workers regarding needle stick and sharps injuries. The study design was a descriptive cross-sectional study design and 272 health care workers (133 males and 139 females) took part in the study. The knowledge of Needle stick and sharp injuries scale developed by the researcher was used to elicit responses from the participants. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyze the demographic variables and the data obtained from the participants. The study population was recruited from a selected tertiary hospital in Enugu state using stratified sampling method and the study was conducted in the year 2015. The result of the study showed that age, years of practice and experience of Needle stick and sharps injuries significantly affected the preventive practices against injuries among health care workers. The ages of the participants range from 21-58 years with the mean and standard deviation as 37.7 and 8.0 respectively. These findings from this study imply that younger health care workers are more likely to have needle stick and sharp injuries than the older ones. Also, people who have spent more years in practice are likely to record more injuries. Finally, the study result implies that people who have had Needle sticks and sharps injuries are more likely to take precautions and measures to avoid its occurrence in the future. Employers of health care workers should ensure that the younger staff are properly trained in the safe use and disposal of needles, the training should be on-going at short intervals to make up for the greater years of practice their older counterparts have over them; they should also modify work practices that can result in injuries; safety awareness should be promoted in the work environment and most importantly, procedures for reporting and timely follow up of all Needlestick and sharp related injuries should be established and encouraged.


Keywords
 

Needlestick, Sharp Injuries, Health Care, Hospital, Enugu


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