ISSN: 2375-3765
American Journal of Chemistry and Application  
Manuscript Information
 
 
Amino Groups Are Crucial for Chitosan to Stop Bleeding
American Journal of Chemistry and Application
Vol.5 , No. 2, Publication Date: May 10, 2018, Page: 22-28
95 Views Since May 10, 2018, 17 Downloads Since May 10, 2018
 
 
Authors
 
[1]    

Haibo Lu, Institute of Orthopedics of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, China; Department of Orthopaedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China; Department of Clinic Medicine, Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

[2]    

Shibi Lu, Institute of Orthopedics of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, China.

[3]    

Zhanjun Song, National Center of Biomedical Analysis, Beijing, China.

[4]    

Ming Zhang, Institute of Chemical Defense of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, China.

[5]    

Jiang Peng, Institute of Orthopedics of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, China.

[6]    

Jian Zhang, Department of Orthopaedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China.

[7]    

Yong Luo, Department of Clinic Medicine, Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

[8]    

Chenyang Nie, Department of Clinic Medicine, Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

[9]    

Sen Li, Department of Clinic Medicine, Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

[10]    

Quanyi Guo, Institute of Orthopedics of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, China.

 
Abstract
 

Marine organisms adhere themselves onto wet surfaces by adhesive proteins containing L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Several research groups have incorporated DOPA, or other compounds that contain 3,4-dihydroxybenzene, into backbone of polymeric materials, and have found the improved adhesive properties. Although current positively charged chitosan hemostatic agents have limited adhesive property, especially to wet surfaces underneath blood pool, there is no report about modifying chitosan with 3,4-dihydroxybenzene to achieve improved adhesive property so far, and the exact mechanism of chitosan’s positive charging is still unknown. Using two methods, we modified chitosan with 3,4-dihydroxybenzene. One is modifying with 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (DHBH), the other is with DOPA. The chemical structures of chitosan, Celox, DHBH, DMCTS, DOPA and DOPAMCTS were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The coagulation test was performed to compare the hemostatic property of DMCTS and DOPAMCTS to that of chitin, chitosan and Celox. FTIR results revealed extreme similarity of chemical structures of chitosan and Celox, especially in presence of N-H bending vibration of primary amines, the incorporation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzene from DMCTS and DOPA into backbone of chitosan. The coagulation time of chitosan, Celox and DOPAMCTS was significantly shorter than that of chitin and DMCTS. The blood drops touching Celox, chitosan and DOPAMCTS particles appeared significant surface-tension phenomenon. Amino groups are crucial for chitosan to stop bleeding. Modification with 3,4-dihydroxybenzene does not impair the hemostatic property of chitosan as long as the free or protonated amino groups does not be modified. It is feasible to modify chitosan with 3,4-dihydroxybenzene to develop a novel hemostatic dressing.


Keywords
 

3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, Chitosan, 3,4-dihydroxybenzene Modified Chitosan, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine Modified Chitosan, Celox, Hemostatic Agent, FTIR


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